The Peacock Escritoire as Holy Relic

 

One of the major themes seems – in retrospect – to be the nature of books from the sturdiest and most flamboyant to the most ephemeral (e- books and hair-trigger flakes?) via loose-leaved parchments, autumn leaves in fact tied loosely, and a gossamer holy relic floating in the air or a holy relic created from literature as is THE PEACOCK ESCRITOIRE itself as a physical object treating the business of holy relics. Which is ironic as it also ”flies” flamboyantly with its feather. Very thought-provoking – and the couplings with ungraspable things like artwork in Sime and Caruso – wind-scrying, bird-scrying, sand-writing, eclectic collecting, and as its publisher says, ‘love’ is ‘over the top’ like the love involved in producing this ‘book’, but so is bravery sometimes and to do things the way one thinks, self-sacrifice, self-dispersal as in Proust or Ligotti or some religions, the dolls-within-dolls indeed of formal faiths, the challenge-and-response of history and so forth…

This ‘book’ is a wonderful collection of texts by Mark Valentine (as I’ve shown in my review), enhanced by artwork, made provocative by its large plush & purple escritoire-box with mottled lining and discrete book of physical strength and beauty as well as additional loose-leaved potential risk or randomness – within its own Holy Relic appearance and ‘feel’. And like most Holy Relics ‘over the top’, even cranky, but highly memorable and with a ‘certain power’.

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4 responses to “The Peacock Escritoire as Holy Relic

  1. http://weirdmonger.livejournal.com/126045.html
    The above link is to my review of ‘The Peacock’s Eye’ by Frances Oliver, and on the cover an exact replica of the Peacock’s Feather that comes in the Escritoire:

    Photobucket

  2. Pingback: SONG OF SUSANNAH – The Dark Tower | My Last Balcony

  3. Important to Peacock Escritoire – last night’s TV proramme on reliquaries:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b012248j
    Fiction as reliquary.

    and, dare I say, ‘Nemonymous Night’ – our planet as reliquary.

  4. Pingback: Treasures of Heaven | The Glistenberry Festival

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